The 6th edition of Global BioImaging annual gathering will have the theme “Imaging Research Infrastructures in a time of change” and will take place on the 8th and 9th September 2021 as an online event.

The program of the event including the titles of the talks and the line-up of speakers will be available soon via the GBI web page: https://globalbioimaging.org/exchange-of-experience/exchange-of-experience-vi

Registration is open! The registration form is available here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/EoEVI

Save the date! The European Research Infrastructure Euro BioImaging (EuBI) is organizing an online User Forum on “Understanding and Fighting Cancer”.  The event takes place on June 17, 2021 from 14:00-17:00 CEST and will highlight the importance of cutting-edge imaging technologies in support of cancer research and showcase the specific expertise available at the EuBI Nodes.

In addition, keynote presentations from Kevin Brindle, University of Cambridge, and Frank Winkler, DKFZ, will further reveal the potential of biological and biomedical imaging technologies to boost cancer research. 

The full program is coming soon! In the meantime, you can register here.

For more informationhttps://www.eurobioimaging.eu/news/join-us-for-the-first-euro-bioimaging-user-forum-understanding-and-fighting-cancer/

When: Thursday, June 17th, 14:00-17:00 CEST

Where: Online

Please spread the word within your network! 

Quantifying translation in space and time during development

During development, precise control of gene expression allows the reproducible establishment of patterns, leading to the formation of organs at the right time and place.

The establishment of developmental patterns has been primarily studied at the transcriptional level. In comparison, the fate of these transcripts received little attention.

Dufourt*, Bellec* et al deployed the SunTag labeling method to image the dynamics of translation of individual mRNA molecules in living Drosophila embryos. This led to the discovery of translation factories and unmasked important heterogeneities in the efficiency of translation between identical mRNAs, demonstrating a novel layer of fine-tuning of gene expression.

Imaging translation dynamics in live embryos reveals spatial heterogeneities.

Dufourt J, Bellec M, Trullo A, Dejean M, De Rossi S, Favard C, Lagha M.

Science. 29 avril 2021 doi: 10.1126/science.abc3483.

Contact:

Mounia Lagha (CNRS)

mounia.lagha@igmm.cnrs.fr

+33 434359653

twitter : drosoigmm

Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier (Univ.Montpellier/CNRS) 1919 route de Mende, 34090 Montpellier

On May 25th, 2021, 15:00 CSET, our partner the French Network for Multidimensional Optical Fluorescence Microscopy will receive Edward S. Boyden* from the MIT, USA for a webinar on Expansion Microscopy“Tools for analyzing and repairing biological systems”.

The presentation will be broadcast live on Youtube: https://youtu.be/Xc48aDLDZDI

*invited by Tudor Manoliu (Imaging and Cytometry platform-Gustave Roussy/ FBI Paris-Sud Node)

For several weeks now, the H2P2 histopathology platform located in Rennes (France BioImaging Bretagne-Loire Node) has become the European reference for the integral solution of Cell DIVE (https://www.leica-microsystems.com/products/light-microscopes/p/cell-dive/).

Cell Dive device on H2P2 platform

This technology brings great expectations for the research teams and the private companies with which we work. Leica’s Cell DIVE technology provides an in-depth solution for characterizing the tissue microenvironment using multiplexed imaging technology. Up to 60 biomarkers can be revealed in one tissue sample. An extensive list of antibodies is already validated and users can customize their own panel! The multiplexed Cell DIVE technology is based on successive immunolabeling of 4 antibodies conjugated with 4 fluorochromes (Cy2, Cy3, Cy5 and Cy7). The slides are digitized (x20 objective) as things progress and a final compiled image is obtained and can be analysed with the Halo Image Analysis Platform. This software allows users to do segmentation to highlight clusters, to define specific cell phenotypes, to analyse neighbourhood, heatmap…

For example, in cancer treatment research, researchers need a better understanding of the cellular architecture of normal and diseased tissues to develop better treatments and more accurately predict disease progression. 

This technology has been developed by scientists for scientists over the last decade and several publications are available to date (https://www.leica-microsystems.com/products/light-microscopes/p/cell-dive/publications/).

Images from human tonsil with 9 biomarkers.

For more information about the Cell Dive technology or to discuss your project, you can contact Nicolas Mouchet nicolas.mouchet@univ-rennes1.fr

Grant Applications for organizing Virtual/Hybrid Training Schools are open!

COMULIS is now launching a call to financially support virtual and hybrid training schools fulfilling the following conditions:

  • the training school has to take place between the 1st of June and 30th of October 2021;
  • it has to be virtual (or hybrid);
  • it has to cover topics of the COMULIS network;
  • led by a COMULIS member or someone who is willing to become one;
  • COMULIS and COST support will have to be diplayed on the program, website, or any related document to the training school;
  • fees that can be covered by this grant include the technical setup of these training schools and training material:
    • If engaging a conference organiser, technician hourly rate if required on specific openings days before and during the event to assist with technical support, attendee management and monitoring, configuration and setup, communication.
    • customer support for attendees, live-stream tech support via email and/or chat.
    • pre-recording of keynotes/teaching sessions for training schools.
    • post-event process management: video editing, recording management.
    • Rental of rooms and audio-visual material
    • Consumables purchased for Training Schools
    • Photocopying and the printing of programmes, handouts, event materials, book of abstracts, book of proceedings, flyers etc

Maximum amount of a grant is 10000 euros, that will be reimbursed on presentation of invoices strictly related to eligible fees above.

Procedure

Filling an online form https://forms.gle/tJqaLmauZDA5V58o6 with check of the above conditions, (pedagogical) program, list of organizers, speakers and trainers, dates, provisional budget including usage of the COMULIS financial support in regards of one or several of the above categories of eligible expenses.

Deadline 1st of June. Notification of acceptance: 15th of June. (if needed earlier please do tell us, and we will do our best to meet you own deadline in case of co-funding).

Criteria among eligible proposals (fulfilling the above checklist) will be based on matching COMULIS objectives (www.comulis.eu) and scientific excellence. Proposal will be ranked by grade following this criteria, and funded until the available budget is used up. Three to ten possible grants, according to budget.

Contact: Perrine.paul-gilloteaux@univ-nantes.frandreas.walter@vbcf.ac.at

Cette action nationale de formation regroupe 160 personnes, techniciens, ingénieurs, chercheurs de centres de recherches, voulant approfondir leurs connaissances en microscopie corrélative.

L’objectif de cette formation est de présenter différentes techniques de microscopie corrélative en essayant de présenter les techniques et les appareils utilisés le plus précisément possible.
Les corrélations abordées concerneront les techniques de microscopie optique classique et à fluorescence, la microscopie électronique à balayage et à transmission, le NanoSIMS, la Fluo-RX et le synchrotron.
Des présentations et des ateliers permettront de bien approfondir les outils utilisés de la préparation des échantillons à la corrélation des images.

Date limite pour les inscriptions : 15 Avril 2021

Crédit image header: Cosenza, M. R. et al. Asymmetric Centriole Numbers at Spindle Poles Cause Chromosome Missegregation in Cancer. CellReports 20, 1906–1920 (2017)

The FOM2021 online  conference will start on Sunday morning, March 28 at 11:30 hrs, and is preceded by free tutorials starting Sunday, 9:15 hrs. Please note that these are local times in Amsterdam which is Central European Time (CET).

Both lectures and posters will be presented “live” by the presenting author. Whole oral sessions will be recorded and be accessible by participants during and after the conference for approximately two months. Contributions will not be recorded and accessible individually.

If you wish to be kept informed on updates, please leave your email address at FocusOnMicroscopy.org/stayinformed.

Key subjects for the conference series are the theory and practice of 3D optical imaging, related 3D image processing, and especially developments in resolution and imaging modalities. The conference series covers also the rapidly advancing fluorescence labeling techniques for confocal and multi-photon 3D imaging of -live- biological specimens.

Typical topics of the upcoming FOM2021 online conference include:

  • Theory and practice of confocal and multiphoton-excitation microscopy
  • Super-resolution/ nanoscopy imaging including: PSF engineering (4pi, SIM, STED), fluorescence activation/quenching, stochastic/centroid (PALM, STORM, GSDIM, SOFI and related techniques), TIRF
  • 3D and 4D live cell and tissue imaging
  • Adaptive optics for microscopy
  • Light sheet microscopy
  • Phase/interference based microscopies
  • OCT, holographic, endoscopy
  • Advanced fluorescence imaging/spectroscopy: FRET, FRAP, FLIM, FCS, SOFI
  • New fluorescent probes, proteins, quantum dots, single molecule imaging
  • Clearing and expansion techniques
  • Coherent non-linear microscopies: SHG, THG, SFG, CARS.
  • Multi-dimensional fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy imaging
  • Correlated microscopies, like light/electron
  • Laser manipulation and tracking, photo-activation
  • Fast acquisition, automated and high-content microscopy
  • 3D image processing and visualization of multidimensional data.

Programme: http://focusonmicroscopy.org/

Registration Deadline: March 25th, 2021

Direct and simultaneous observation of transcription and chromosome architecture in single cells with Hi-M

Andrés M. Cardozo Gizzi, Sergio M. Espinola, Julian Gurgo, Christophe Houbron, Jean-Bernard Fiche, Diego I. Cattoni, Marcelo Nollmann

Simultaneous observation of 3D chromatin organization and transcription at the single cell level and with high spatial resolution may hold the key to unveil the mechanisms regulating embryonic development, cell differentiation and even disease. We have recently developed Hi-M, a technology that allows for the sequential labelling, 3D imaging and localization of multiple genomic DNA loci together with RNA expression in single cells within whole, intact Drosophila embryos. Importantly, Hi-M enables simultaneous detection of RNA expression and chromosome organization without requiring sample unmounting and primary probe re-hybridization. Here, we provide a step-by-step protocol describing the design of probes, the preparation of samples, the stable immobilization of embryos into microfluidics chambers, and the complete procedure for image acquisition. The combined RNA/DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization procedure takes 4-5 days including embryo collection. In addition, we describe image analysis software to segment nuclei, detect genomic spots, correct for drift and produce Hi-M matrices. A typical Hi-M experiment takes 1-2 days to complete all rounds of labelling and imaging and 4 additional days for image analysis. This technology can be easily expanded to investigate cell differentiation in cultured cells, or organization of chromatin within complex tissues.

DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41596-019-0269-9

Contact: Marcelo Nolmann marcnol@gmail.com

ATP-driven separation of liquid phase condensates in bacteria

B. Guilhas, J.C. Walter, J. Rech, G. David, N.-O. Walliser, J. Palmeri, C., Mathieu-Demaziere, A. Parmeggiani, J.Y. Bouet, A. Le Gall1, M. Nollmann

Liquid-liquid phase separated (LLPS) states are key to compartmentalise components in the absence of membranes, however it is unclear whether LLPS condensates are actively and specifically organized in the sub-cellular space and by which mechanisms. Here, we address this question by focusing on the ParABS DNA segregation system, composed of a centromeric-like sequence (parS), a DNA-binding protein (ParB) and a motor (ParA). We show that parS-ParB associate to form nanometer-sized, round condensates. ParB molecules diffuse rapidly within the nucleoid volume, but display confined motions when trapped inside ParB condensates. Single ParB molecules are able to rapidly diffuse between different condensates, and nucleation is strongly favoured by parS. Notably, the ParA motor is required to prevent the fusion of ParB condensates. These results describe a novel active mechanism that splits, segregates and localises non-canonical LLPS condensates in the sub-cellular space.

Guilhas et al. revealed that the bacterial DNA segregation apparatus behaves as a non-canonical phase separation system. This apparatus employs an ATP-powered motor that splits nanometer-sized condensates and localizes them robustly within the nucleoid to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2020.06.034

Contact: Marcelo Nolmann marcnol@gmail.com

The ability to communicate effectively with each other is one of the strongest predictors for our chances to get ahead in life. In their latest publication in Science Advances, scientists and engineers from IGF-Montpellier (CNRS, INSERM, Univ. Montpellier), IPAM platform (BioCampus Montpellier, France-Bioimaging Montpellier Node) and ARO-Israel demonstrated that this also holds true for GnRH neurons.

In humans and all vertebrates, species survival depends on a critical step during embryonic development: the migration of a small subset of GnRH neurons (about 2,000 in humans and less than 100 in fish) from the nose to the brain where they join the hypothalamus to control reproduction. Their latest results unveiled that GnRH neurons make a pause at the nose-brain frontier where they function as an inter-hemispheric network that is isolated from the rest of the brain. Only neurons that integrate into the network and are able to communicate with their neighbors will finally cross the barrier and make their way into the brain, towards their hypothalamic destination.

In other words, these GnRH neurons, that are critical for species persistence, face the same challenges like other immigrants: they must learn to communicate effectively if they are to integrate into their new world.

In this study, in vivo 2-photon microscopy was a key tool for:

  • Long term imaging with minimal bleaching and phototoxicity
  • Upright configuration enabling dorsal imaging of the fish in its natural position
  • Long-distance water-immersion objectives allowing imaging of deep tissue structures without sacrificing image quality
  • Fast calcium imaging
  • Imaging of red GECI using the higher wavelengths
  • Precise cell ablation
  • Photoactivation of ChR2 while monitoring Ca in the red channel
A graphical model illustrating the migration of a single GnRH neuron (marked by black border) from the nasal placode into the zebrafish brain.

M. Golan, J. Boulanger-Weill, A. Pinot, P. Fontanaud, A. Faucherre, D. S. Gajbhiye, L. Hollander-Cohen, T. Fiordelisio-Coll, A. O. Martin, P. Mollard, Synaptic communication mediates the assembly of a self-organizing circuit that controls reproduction. Sci. Adv. 7, eabc8475 (2021). doi: 10.1126/sciadv.abc8475

Contact: Patrice Mollard, IGF, Montpellier patrice.mollard@igf.cnrs.fr