A cette occasion, les plateformes d’imagerie France BioImaging participantes organiseront des activités grand public lors d’une journée “portes ouvertes” le weekend du 25-26 Mai 2019.
Ces activités s’articuleront autour:
– de l’histoire de « l’Imagerie Biologique au CNRS », présentée conjointement par les différents sites de l’infrastructure FBI;
– de diverses animations avec l’objectif de montrer l’éventail impressionnant des outils de l’Imagerie Biologique aujourd’hui et leur fonctionnement,
– des découvertes/applications fantastiques que l’Imagerie Biologique peut apporter en Biologie.

 

 

 

 

 

We are very pleased to announce the 2019 Inserm Workshop "Intracellular dynamics of molecules: analysis and models" (poster attached).

The objective of this workshop is to introduce the main experimental methods for quantifying the mobility and trajectories of biomolecules in living cells, with an emphasis on methods for quantifying individual trajectories and the application of computer simulations and models for their analysis and interpretation.

Phase I (theoretical) will take place in Bordeaux, France, from 24 to 26 June 2019, and Phase II (practical) from 1 to 4 July 2019 in Lyon, France.

All information and (open) registrations are available on the workshop website:

Feel free to register now, as the number of places is limited!

The organizers of the Workshop
Hugues Berry
Cyril Favard
Jean-Baptiste Masson

Symposium Electron Microscopy in Bordeaux

 

[:en]France BioImaging is organising an “BioImage Analysis OpenDesk” session on November the 29th from 9:00 to 12:30, in its different nodes and online.

What is an OpenDesk ?

During the event, users in search for answers to image processing-related questions come to a dedicated spot, within the Facility. Individual questions are processed by BioImage Analysts, on a “first come-first served basis”.

Will I really get my image processing questions answered ?

We will work on that ! Depending on the topic, local BioImage Analyst may choose from one of those three options:
1-The problem might be solved locally, quickly: you will leave the Facility with either a procedure/advices on how to analyse your data.
2-The problem might be solved locally, but requires additional time to be processed: your Facility staff will propose an appointment so that a proper solution is found.
3-The problem might not be solved locally: we will take benefit of the France BioImaging infrastructure, through its dedicated transversal node (FBI-IPDM). Your local Facility staff will introduce you to specialists in the field, using remote communication means.

I’m in ! Where and when is it taking place ?

November the 29th, from 9:00 to 12:30.
Bordeaux — Bordeaux Imaging Centre, Photonic Unit, 1st floor, Centre Broca Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Montpellier
Paris Centre
Marseille — IBDM ground Floor  Luminy
Paris Sud
Nantes — Room 2 , ground floor IRS UN 8 quai Moncousu

If you can not join physically, join on https://rendez-vous.renater.fr/ipdm

By the way, what is FBI-IPDM ?

The objective of the BioImage Informatics – Image Processing & Data Management transversal node is to create a general framework and a complete and integrated image analysis and IT (Information Technology) solution to address a number of challenges in biological imaging and microscopy, as well as setting up a high performance grid-computing infrastructure dedicated to massive computational and data storage demands. The FBI-IPDM node proposes different IT frameworks to deal with the data flow from the different imaging nodes. FBI-IPDM node is thus transverse, by definition.[:fr]France BioImaging is organizing a “BioImage Analysis OpenDesk” session on November the 29th from 9:00 to 12:30, in its different nodes and online.

What is an OpenDesk ?

During the event, users in search for answers to image processing-related questions come to a dedicated spot, within the Facility. Individual questions are processed by BioImage Analysts, on a “first come-first served basis”.

Will I really get my image processing questions answered ?

We will work on that! Depending on the topic, local BioImage Analyst may choose from one of those three options:
1-The problem might be solved locally, quickly: you will leave the Facility with either a procedure/ advice on how to analyze your data.
2-The problem might be solved locally, but requires additional time to be processed: your Facility staff will propose an appointment so that a proper solution is found.
3-The problem might not be solved locally: we will take benefit of the France BioImaging infrastructure, through its dedicated transversal node (FBI-IPDM). Your local Facility staff will introduce you to specialists in the field, using remote communication means.

I’m in ! Where and when is it taking place ?

November the 29th, from 9:00 to 12:30.
Bordeaux — Bordeaux Imaging Centre, Photonic Unit, 1st floor, Centre Broca Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Montpellier
Paris Centre
Marseille — IBDM ground Floor Luminy
Paris Sud
Nantes — Room 2, ground floor IRS UN 8 Quai Moncousu

If you can not join physically, join on https://rendez-vous.renater.fr/ipdm

By the way, what is FBI-IPDM ?

The objective of the BioImage Informatics – Image Processing & Data Management transversal node is to create a general framework and a complete and integrated image analysis and IT (Information Technology) solution to address a number of challenges in biological imaging and microscopy, as well as setting up a high performance grid-computing infrastructure dedicated to massive computational and data storage demands. The FBI-IPDM node proposes different IT frameworks to deal with the data flow from the different imaging nodes. FBI-IPDM node is thus transverse, by definition.[:]

Image processing and data analysis are crucial steps in biological research. Gathering usable data presents challenges; exploiting the data efficiently also has its own issues. While every lab has its way of dealing with that matter, it became clear over the last years that there is a lack of local and transversal expertise on the topic. As such, there is a growing need for reliable solutions for data analysis.

These observations call for the creation of integrated solutions in image data processing and analysis (pipeline, workflow, etc.), at the crossroads between innovation and end-user needs.

To this end, the France BioImaging Image Processing and Data Management team created a questionnaire which aims to gather information about your current practices and your needs. It takes less than 3 minutes to fill out. We will use the responses to elaborate new image analysis services catered to the requirements of the biological imaging community.

Thank you in advance for your contribution!

Image Analysis Questionnaire
Please answer the questions below to allow us to evaluate your needs for image analysis. We will use the responses to elaborate new image analysis services catered to the needs of the French biological imaging community.
6
Hourly rate in Euros.
Hourly rate in Euros.

General information

If you are not located in France, please indicate the country and state/city in the "Other" field.
The information collected in this questionnaire is entirely anonymous, and will not be used outside of France BioImaging's activities.
La petite Venise de la biologie © Carine Rossé, Emilie Lagoutte & Marie Irondelle, Institut Curie
La petite Venise de la biologie © Carine Rossé, Emilie Lagoutte & Marie Irondelle, Institut Curie

Researchers and imaging engineers know better than anyone that an image is always more than meets the eye. Let us honor the winning image of our 2017 Image Contest by delving a little deeper into what lies behind these Venice canals.

The image represents a large part of mice mammary gland. The canals spreading out like branches, are composed of two layers of cells: the epithelial epithelial cells – stained by anti-keratin 8 (in pink) – are surrounded by myoepithetial cells (in blue) stained by an anti-Smooth Muscle Actin. These cells, thanks to their contractile properties, participate in the? secretions from the gland. The yellow cells are modified cells, overexpressing tomato protein. The adipocytes of the mammary gland can be seen in the background.

The image was made by Marie Irondelle (PICT-IBiSA Biomaging Cell and Tissue Core Facility, Curie Institute), using a confocal microscope. It is a mosaic reconstruction – using the tile scan technique -from several depths of field with a range of 110 µm. The lighter areas are higher up in the sample, while the darker areas correspond to zones deeper in the tissue. The final projection measures 1.2 by 0.78 mm. The ducts shown in the picture have a diameter of 50 to 60 microns.

Carine Rossé and Emilie Lagoutte in the lab of Philippe Chavrier (membrane & Actin dynamics lab), from the Curie Institute, set out to study the behavior and movement of few cancerous cells inside the mammary gland. However, such a study required the development of alternative methods of observation, from the traditional methods of analysis, in order to observe the localization of the cells in the whole gland. The solution came from a 2016 Nature Methods paper entitled “Shrinkage-mediated imaging of entire organs and organisms using uDISCO”[1]. In this method, the researchers described the advantages of the uDISCO tissue-clearing protocol for the analysis of large samples, compared to other well-known methods. After adapting the protocol, Emilie Lagoutte was able to clear entire mice. She obtained and stained mammary glands that were shrunk by about 70% compared to their original size, cleared. The advantages of this technique are numerous; in particular, there is no more tissue loss due to slicing samples, the fluorescence can be maintained for a few weeks, and the reduced size of the sample allows to visualize the whole organ, leading to a higher chance to detect the zone of interest.

Imaging facilities and researchers have to work hand-in-hand to produce the best results possible. Marie Irondelle stressed the necessity for researchers to be educated about imaging technologies and their limitations; a state-of-the-art microscope will never be able to compensate for a low-quality sample. In the case of The Little Venice, the PICT-IBiSA Biomaging Cell and Tissue Core Facility collaboration with the Chavrier lab is undoubtedly a winning one.

[1] https://www.nature.com/articles/nmeth.3964

Dear colleagues, dear FBI community,

The National Coordination and Industry Board are proud to announce that the winners of the FBI Image Contest 2017 are:

1. Marie Irondelle – PiCT Institut Curie with “Biology’s Little Venice”

La petite Venise de la biologie © Carine Rossé, Emilie Lagoutte & Marie Irondelle, Institut Curie

La petite Venise de la biologie © Carine Rossé, Emilie Lagoutte & Marie Irondelle – Institut Curie
Confocal microscopy

Transparisation par U DISCO d’une glande mammaire murine régénérée à partir d’un transplant d’organoides mammaire murin.

2. Orestis Faklaris – Institut Jacques Monod – ImagoSeine with “The Tree of Life”

The Tree of Life © Orestis Faklaris, Nicolas Chevalier – Institut Jacques Monod
Ultramicroscope – light sheet microscopy

3D z-stack projection of transparised chicken embryo stomach. Label betaIII-tubulin – Alexa488.

3. Clémence Simon – UMR 8576 CNRS/Université Lille 1 with “When Chemistry Transcends Lignin”

Quand la chimie transcende la lignine ! 1 © Clémence Simon, Unité de Glycobiologie Structurale et Fonctionnelle, UMR8576
Microscopie confocale, MIP, BLISS

Application de la stratégie de double réaction chimique BLISS aux unités p-hydroxyphényle et guaïaicyle de la lignine sur coupe de racine de lin. Observation du double marquage (+ autofluorescence) par microscopie confocale et représentation par projection maximale d’intensité. Taille de l’image : 510 x 510 microns.

FBI Industry Committee Special Prize: Nathanaël Prunet – California Institute of Technology with “Arabidopsis Inflorescence”

Arabidopsis inflorescence 1 © Nathanaël Prunet, Caltech, Meyerowitz lab
Confocal microscopy

This is a live Arabidopsis inflorescence with young flower buds developing at the periphery. Cell walls have been stained with propidium iodide (grey). Fluorescent reporters were used to monitor the expression of the APETALA3 (AP3, green) and SUPERMAN (SUP, red) genes. AP3 is required for the development of stamens (the male organs), while SUP establishes the boundary between the male and female part of the flower. This picture was acquired using live confocal imaging, which allows us to describe the expression of several genes in both space and time, in the same live biological samples, with a precise cellular resolution. It finally allows us to understand a question that has been elusive for 25 years: how the male/female boundary is established during the formation of the flower. My research aims at understanding how flower buds are patterned as they form.

Thank you to all the participants for their great contributions:

  • Dario Donnarumma, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221 CNRS-UM
  • Filippo Piccinini, IRST
  • Aude Nommick, IBDM – Marseille University
  • Sébastien Marais, Bordeaux Imaging Center
  • Marie Held, Biochemistry, University of Liverpool, Levy Lab
  • Patrice Mascalchi, Bordeaux Imaging Center and Frédéric Saltel, INSERM U-1053, University of Bordeaux
  • Corrado Viotti, Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, CNRS, Strasbourg – P. Genschik Lab
  • Marcello Delfini & Mathieu Fallet, CIML CNRS-INSERM-AMU
  •  Jonathan Daniel, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires
  • Laurence Dubreil, APEX-UMR703 PAnTher INRA Oniris
  • Pierre-Olivier Strale, Interdisciplinary Institute for Neuroscience
  • Clémence Simon, Unité de Glycobiologie Structurale et Fonctionnelle, UMR8576
  • Jérémie Teillon, INSERM U1034
  • Morgane Rabineau, Inserm
  • Eve Gazave & Nicolas Rabet, Institut Jacques Monod-CNRS
  • Nathanaël Prunet, Caltech, Meyerowitz lab
  • Françoise Geffroy, CEA-DRF-NeuroSpin-UNIRS, Midas Team
  • Valeria Davi, ImagoSeine – Institut Jacques Monod – CNRS
  • Anna Smirnova, University of Strasbourg – GMGM
  • Debora Olivier, Institut Pasteur
  • Orestis Faklaris, Institut Jacques Monod
  • Xavier Baudin, Institut Jacques Monod
  • Mathieu P. Dailly, CMAS
  • Lucie Sengmanivong, UMR 144, Institut Curie, Paris
  • Marie Irondelle, Institut Curie

Thank you also to the core facilities staff and heads for having forwarded the contest to their users and for providing them state of the art bioimaging.

The National Coordination

Perrine Paul-Gilloteaux, bio-image analyst, CNRS research engineer and project manager of our Bio-image informatics node, received last month the 2017 CNRS Crystal Prize, awarding her contributions to French research.

A perfect occasion to highlight her career and her work with France BioImaging. What is eC-CLEM? How can our field deal with the massive amount of data produced? What future developments can we expect in the realm of bio-image informatics? Read the interview below to find out more.


Perrine Paul-Gilloteaux
Perrine Paul-Gilloteaux

Could you introduce yourself briefly?

My name is Perrine Paul-Gilloteaux, I’m a CNRS Research Engineer. I have a background in electrical engineering, signal and image processing, and did my PhD in augmented reality for neurosurgery through surgical microscope. I started working in bio-image analysis for microscopy in Ireland, and joined the Curie Institute on the PICT IBISA facility in 2010. I moved to Nantes in 2015, and now work in a biomedical research institute. I am also the project manager of the France BioImaging node Bio-Image Informatics IPDM (Image Processing & Data Management), and work closely with the national coordination on the aspect of data management.

I define myself as a bio-image analyst, meaning that I do my best to bridge the gap between microscopy, image analysis and biology. This means that I’m involved in data management, data processing and data analysis projects, that I provide as a service in facilities or work on as research topics.

How long have you been involved with FBI, and what main projects have you carried out with us?

I’ve been involved in FBI from its inception. I started working within the transversal IPDM working group, where we first defined the state of our management systems and worked on the interoperability of our data bases. I managed the setup of the Curie Image Database, supported by France Bio Imaging, based on the OpenImadis system. In 2015, I was nominated project manager of the IPDM node, led by Jean-Christophe Olivo-Marin and Charles Kervrann. One important part of my mission is to work with the national coordination on the data management aspect in FBI. For this, we started by making a survey of resources and management system on site. This question of data management is now central, and FBI collaborates with other infrastructures at the European level: EuroBioImaging and ELIXIR, but also at the national level with other national infrastructures in biology using microscopies, and with the French Institute of BioInformatics (ELIXIR French node).

You have developed a software called eC-CLEM. Could you explain what it consists of?

For this project, I’ve worked closely with Xavier Heiligenstein (Curie Institute, FBI working group on multimodal imaging). Ec-CLEM (for Easy-Cell-Correlative Light to Electron Microscopy) is a software designed to help correlative microscopies. The purpose is to help the fusion of information obtained by different modalities of microscopy on the same sample (for example electronic microscopy, photonic microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.). The software allows to register, i.e. align in the same system of coordinates, multidimensional images with big scale and resolution differences, either with a manual input of the user, either automatically when possible. In addition, it provides an estimation of the error of alignment, based on statistical methods, and detects the deformations that the sample may have undergone. I’ve developed a set of algorithms implemented as plugins for the ICY platform. [note: Perrine has published a paper about eC-CLEM in Nature Methods] During the development of this set of tools, I was greatly helped by the ICY coding parties (Hackatons) organized at Pasteur with the support of FBI, and I would encourage developers to attend such events, as there are always new things to be learnt.

Perrine Paul-Gilloteaux presents her work during the Crystal Prize Ceremony.
Perrine presents her work during the Crystal Prize Ceremony
at Nantes University in December 2017.

Bio-image informatics have taken the center stage lately, as more and more people realize how crucial image processing is for research. Could you expand a bit on that?

It is entirely true, and this is the reason why FBI has had a transversal node on that activity since its creation. I’ve cofounded a network of bio-image analysts (NEUBIAS) for that exact purpose also. The size and the number of data to be processed, the large amount of different questions to be answered from imaging and the interplaying between acquisition and processing to generate imaging data and analysis data, have led to a complexity of analysis which requires expert tools but also expert people. Bio-image informatics is a field of research by itself, and it is now recognized as such. It is bridging the gap between image processing research and biology research based on imaging. It can be seen also from the recent Nobel prizes in chemistry: in cryo-tomography or in super resolution light microscopy, both developments were relying on image processing as an essential part.

What are going to be, according to you, the next big steps and developments in the realm of image processing and data management?

The novelties in our field is two-sided: from one side we have data exploding in size and number, and on the other side, machine learning -and in particular deep learning- benefits from progress in hardware and opens the way to big progress in analysis and in particular in feature recognition (segmentation and tracking).

Regarding data management, the big issues to be solved need to involve the whole imaging community, but also to seek expertise from other fields with the same problems. Technical solutions, both from the software side (with management software such as OpenImadis, Omero, Bioemergences in France BioImaging nodes) or the hardware side (optimized hardware systems, optimized protocols of data transfer) are on their way, but will not be useful if the biologists do not put effort in data curation and data selection.

Up to this day, even with machine learning, tuning a software or a protocol to respond to a particular problem and a particular set of data requires a lot of effort, either to set up the learning network or train it in the case of machine learning, either to combine algorithm for a specific question in adapted workflows or to develop more performing algorithm. It means that we need well trained expert able to master both the image processing aspect and the biological questions behind.

On what will your FBI working group focus in 2018? What can we expect from you? (in terms of new developments, priorities, events etc.)

The priority is definitely to deal with the explosion of data we are facing. In addition to the directions exposed in the previous question (software and hardware solutions), one direction taken by IPDM on data management is the definition of quality data. For this multi-faceted topic, we have already started to set up tools to measure the quality of the data produced in term of resolution for example, based on the expertise in metrology of our facilities members, that we want to demonstrate in 2018. We will also concretize the collaborations between FBI and the other national infrastructures by running tests, for example on the speed of data transfers between node, in order to make sure that at the end of 2018, each user of the FBI nodes can easily access and process her/his data from anywhere.  A technical catalogue of software and hardware resources is under construction, to allow FBI nodes and beyond to benefit wisely from the tools and networks created by FBI. In the first semester of 2018, we will be organizing an event to discuss and define the changes in bio-image informatics that deep learning could bring about (further information to come soon, please refer to the FBI site).

References:

http://www.cnrs.fr/fr/recherche/prix/cristal.htm (in French)

Relevant publications:

Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine, Heiligenstein Xavier et al. “EC-CLEM: flexible multidimensional registration software for correlative microscopies.” Nature Methods, vol. 14, no. 2, 2017, pp. 102–103., doi:10.1038/nmeth.4170. https://www.nature.com/articles/nmeth.4170

The dissemination of emerging technologies to end-users is a key objective of FranceBioImaging. It is indeed essential that developers can obtain feedback from the end-users on their technologies. It is equally important that end-users can feed the thoughts and work of the developers. France BioImaging has thus invested in the dissemination of recently developed technologies in the Paris Centre node in the form of short videos.

The first two videos focus respectively on a fast-developing correlative imaging method that combines fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy, and on a powerful reversible fluorescent protein labeling technology. These two technologies (as well as others currently developed in the Paris Centre node of FranceBioImaging) led to the creation of two start-ups (CryoCapCell and Twinkle Bioscience) thus illustrating another side of the dissemination action engaged by the actors of FranceBioImaging.

We are proud to present these videos created in collaboration with Picta Productions and the Paris Centre Node. Xavier Heiligenstein (Curie Institute) and Arnaud Gautier (ENS) present their research and their work, supported by France BioImaging in their inception.

This research has led to the creation of CryoCapCell, which develops and manufactures new products for sample preparation in the field of electron microscopy, such as the CryoCapsule and the HPM Light µ machine.

Relevant Publications:

Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine, Xavier Heiligenstein, Martin Belle, Marie-Charlotte Domart, Banafshe Larijani, Lucy Collinson, Graça Raposo, and Jean Salamero. “EC-CLEM: flexible multidimensional registration software for correlative microscopies.” Nature Methods 14, no. 2 (2017): 102-03. doi:10.1038/nmeth.4170. (http://rdcu.be/oVA9)

Heiligenstein, Xavier, Martin Belle, Frederic Eyraud, Graça Raposo, Jean Salamero, and Jerome Heiligenstein. “The HPM Live μ–From Live Cell Imaging to High Pressure Freezing in Less than 2 Seconds for Correlative Microscopy Approaches.” Microscopy and Microanalysis 23, no. S1 (2017): 1276-277. doi:10.1017/s1431927617007048.

Heiligenstein, Xavier, Ilse Hurbain, Cédric Delevoye, Jean Salamero, Claude Antony, and Graca Raposo. “Step by Step Manipulation of the CryoCapsule with HPM High Pressure Freezers.” Methods in Cell Biology Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy II, 2014, 259-74. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-801075-4.00012-4.


Research and development of the FAST technology is now undertaken through the startup Twinkle Bioscience. FAST offers new perspectives for cellular imaging, notably for high content screening or genome editing.

Relevant Publications:

Pimenta, Frederico M., Giovanni Chiappetta, Thomas Le Saux, Joëlle Vinh, Ludovic Jullien, and Arnaud Gautier. “Chromophore Renewal and Fluorogen-Binding Tags: A Match Made to Last.” Scientific Reports 7, no. 1 (2017). doi:10.1038/s41598-017-12400-9.

Li, Chenge, Alison Tebo, and Arnaud Gautier. “Fluorogenic Labeling Strategies for Biological Imaging.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences 18, no. 7 (2017): 1473. doi:10.3390/ijms18071473.

Jullien, Ludovic, and Arnaud Gautier. “Des sondes fluorescentes hybrides pour l’imagerie « à la demande  » des protéines cellulaires.” Médecine/sciences 33, no. 6–7 (2017): 576-78. doi:10.1051/medsci/20173306006.

Li, Chenge, Marie-Aude Plamont, Hanna L. Sladitschek, Vanessa Rodrigues, Isabelle Aujard, Pierre Neveu, Thomas Le Saux, Ludovic Jullien, and Arnaud Gautier. “Dynamic multicolor protein labeling in living cells.” Chem. Sci. 8, no. 8 (2017): 5598-605. doi:10.1039/c7sc01364g.

Plamont, Marie-Aude, Emmanuelle Billon-Denis, Sylvie Maurin, Carole Gauron, Frederico M. Pimenta, Christian G. Specht, Jian Shi, Jérôme Quérard, Buyan Pan, Julien Rossignol, Karine Moncoq, Nelly Morellet, Michel Volovitch, Ewen Lescop, Yong Chen, Antoine Triller, Sophie Vriz, Thomas Le Saux, Ludovic Jullien, and Arnaud Gautier. “Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113, no. 3 (2015): 497-502. doi:10.1073/pnas.1513094113.
Highlighted in ‘This week in PNAS’ in PNAS 113 (3), 465-467 (2016).

 

This September, the “Global BioImaging” partners met in Bangalore at the NCBS, for the second workshop “Exchange of Experience II”. All continents were represented, with participants from Europe (EMBL, Finland, France, Italy, UK; under the EuroBioImaging banner), Australia, India, USA, South Africa, Japan, and new communities on board (e.g. Canada, Singapore).

In the frame of the past GBI program, the two first International Training Courses for Core Facility Staff organized in November 2016 and the first year of the International Job Shadowing Program were very successful and greatly acknowledged by their participants.

Beside an exhaustive presentation of the Project Status, major discussions on Open access to imaging infrastructures, image data management, quality management, Training for facility staff took place and were illustrated by diverse and very interesting presentations.

Other important issues were addressed concerning the future of “Global BioImaging”, beyond the end of the H2020 funded project and the engagement of the national communities. All participants were eager to pursue their collaboration beyond the initial project duration. In the concluding sessions of EoE II, it was agreed to :

  • Extend the GBI Management Board (EuBI Beneficiaries, Australia, India + Argentina, Canada, Japan, Singapore, South Africa, USA). A virtual meeting to start the work on the long-term sustainability strategy will be launched in the coming weeks.
  • Help engagement ‘at home’ and facilitate dialogue with national imaging community and funders. A brief position paper on the international GBI network will be written.

Other information:

The second call of the “International Job Shadowing Program” has now been launched. Please take a look at http://www.eurobioimaging.eu/content-page/international-job-shadowing-program

Stay informed: The next EoE will take place back-to-back with the International Microscopy Conference IMC-19 on Sep 14-15th, 2018 in Sydney, hosted by the AMMRF.

The Global BioImaging project entails an international job shadowing program that aims to give the opportunity to the project’s stakeholders to visit imaging facilities across the globe and learn from their peers.

The program allows both the hosting facilities and their guests to exchange experiences and ideas, while working on innovative imaging technologies and the related technical aspects. It also has the added value to support networking and prepare possible future collaborations between imaging infrastructures.

After the success of the first round of the Global BioImaging shadowing program, which took place during 2017, the call for the second round is now open!

Imaging facility staff members within the Global BioImaging (GBI) Project Network (Euro-BioImaging, Australian National Imaging Facility, Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Research Facility, India-BioImaging) who wish to make a period of job shadowing at another GBI imaging facility can now apply to the program. Visits are foreseen to be international (from Europe to India/Australia and vice versa).

A limited number of travel grants is available for this second round of shadowing.

Applications will be scored by a panel of international external experts on the basis of applicants’ CVs and compliance between their positions and the requested job shadowing. The travel grants will be assigned to the highest scoring applications.You can find below the general guidelines for the shadowing program and a list of hosting facilities. Please read these documents carefully and if interested apply to the program by filling-in the on-line form at the following link: https://www.research.net/r/gbijobshadowing . Please be aware that you will be asked to upload a CV and a letter of approval from your supervisor/facility manager.

For all details, please visit the dedicated page on the Euro BioImaging website.

Practical information

Deadline for submission of the applications is Sunday 22/10/2017.

Selected applicants will be contacted/informed in November 2017. Visits should take place during the first half of 2018.

For more information, feel free to contact:

Alessandra Viale, WP5 manager (Biomedical Imaging facilities) alessandra.viale@unito.it

Maritta Löytömäki WP5 manager (Biological Imaging facilities) tbi-office@bioimaging.fi

Inga Pukonen, WP5 manager (Biological Imaging facilities) tbi-office@bioimaging.fi

 

June 10th, 2017.
June 10th, 2017.

France BioImaging has initiated a partnership with the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Science and the Institute of Molecular Medicine of Peking University. The envisioned collaboration should be articulated around the following goals:

  • To reinforce joint research activities and publications;
  • To develop joint training activities for diverse categories of personnel, including imaging core facility staff;
  • To exchange information and materials in those fields which are of interest to both parties;
  • To organize joint conferences and academic programs;
  • To develop grant proposals for joint research, infrastructure development (center and/or consortium);
  • To foster technology transfer between each parties.

Several French institutions will take part in the partnership. We hope that the France BioImaging users and partners will be able to benefit from this partnership starting in 2018.